Egyptian Youth meets Social Media

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Ali and Eli-Sharnouby express that the youth of Egypt (the age of 29 and under) grew up in such dictatorial-like government that it led such individuals to grow up in desperation of not having the ability to find a job, marriage, or any sense of freedom to voice their opinions. Social Media Networks became a platform for the youth and gave them the opportunity to become the voice of change in the authoritarian regime as well as the opportunity to rebuild Egypt. However, not necessarily did Social Networks cause the desired outcome.

Ali and Eli-Sharnouby express that the youth of Egypt (the age of 29 and under) grew up in such dictatorial-like government that it led such individuals to grow up in desperation of not having the ability to find a job, marriage, or any sense of freedom to voice their opinions. Social Media Networks became a platform for the youth and gave them the opportunity to become the voice of change in the authoritarian regime as well as the opportunity to rebuild Egypt. However, not necessarily did Social Networks cause the desired outcome. 

In Egypt, Social Media Networks became a platform to easily spread information and make publicly visible on sites such as Facebook and Twitter. It has a network to reach a numerous amount of people, helping one spread information faster and accurately as it can be mobile and easy to update. “Furthermore, the applications of Social Networks are extremely low costs…”( Faris, p.5)  and easy to use. All these factors were used in the social movement Facebook page ” We are Khaled Said”, named after a 28 year-old who was brutally murdered.

The actual Facebook page shows photos of Khaled Said and his case and other types of violence that goes on on “a daily basis” in Egypt (Facebook,2016). The page raised the attention of many activists to arouse the issues of torture and human rights making other Egyptian issues such as socio-economic problems obscured. What does this mean? In my theory, to all the people ( majority of youth) that have access to Social Networks have the opportunity to engage on those platforms and gives them the chance to decide whether or not they want to be part of it. However, once already exposed to the issue, such as the one brought up by the Khaled Said page, it sort of lessens those other issues that also should be talked about. The Khaled Said page already provided a movement for others to engage it as it already has a numerous amount of “friends” and is an active page in comparison to other issues brought upon the youth. In no means am I saying the Khaled Said tragedy to be less than any other issue,but rather, with now the power of Social Media which is gives the ability to easily publish information, an array of important issues should be brought into light.

Both Social Media Networks and the Egyptian youth have the ability to make a change, however, whether or not it will make a positive influence is based on the strategic and well thought out measures the youth is willing to make and the current of their society.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Egyptian Youth meets Social Media

One thought on “Egyptian Youth meets Social Media

  1. gabmaria93 says:

    Lizette, I definitely agree with what you’re saying in regards to having an array of issues being brought to light with these online platforms. Social Media Networks are influential digital tools that help communicate important issues that people are facing in authoritarian countries. Unfortunately, like in Egypt, some issues are brought to light while others are overlooked and many times, completely ignored. But it’s good to point out this particular issue with Social Media campaigns and online activism because it makes us aware of the disparity which can be an eye opener and a driving force for change.

    Like

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