Brave Bloggers

Bassel Safadi a software developer who advanced software for the internet to help people be active online and find new ways to communicate. I found the articles on him very interesting and informative as he quickly posed a threat to the security of the Assad regime. I find it questionable that they’ve detained him for this long because they would be only doing so for some kind of ransom or possibly forcing some kind of job on him. But then again, knowing the brutality and cruelty of the Assad regime, he could also be unfortunately already executed. I think that Bassell’s actions were literally the driving force for people to not only express themselves and start internet campaigns but allowed them the opportunity to do so. Obviously for a totalitarian regime like Assad’s this would be seen as the worst thing to happen because now people can interact and share ideas with each other and in any other part of the world. I also found it amazing that his actions inspired so many digital activists to exist like the many campaigns in Egypt and Tunisia. Or Mohammad Erraji from Morocco who dared to speak out against the King of Morocco on an internet blog. Unfortunately, with such access comes a lot of danger because one person blogging a message can be sent to thousands of people at a time, which for the regimes in these countries poses a huge threat to their sovereignty and legitimacy. I think that the activists online in these countries in the Middle East have admirable courage and guts to risk their lives to change the state of their societies. As for Bassell Saffadi I think that he tried to change the ideas about human rights in his country and it has cost him his life. But I find it even more extraordinary that other bloggers from other countries have continued to express their ideas and activism despite knowing the dangers of being caught. It’s amazing to me that the digital activism has been active and will continue to be as much as the government attempts to control major social networking sites. I do hope that these activists continue to inspire people in their countries to stand up against the injustice, just as they have.

Brave Bloggers

4 thoughts on “Brave Bloggers

  1. lizpina says:

    I think Bassel Safadi had alot of guts for being such a huge advocate for internet, nevertheless creating a software were people can have free access to it. I think it’s amazing to realize how vital the internet can be, important enough to cause a man to be killed or be captive til this day.I thought he could still be alive, but after the discussion we had in class Monday, I feel that the odds are that he is dead.

    One thing that I thought was weird was how calm they made the wife seem. If that was my husband I would be searching for him, especially if I am a lawyer, I would pull all my connections to find him. Yet again this is construction based off my opinion. Maybe the article omitted more of the emotions the wife felt. Overall, you’ve raised some good points @sanasayedi.

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  2. It`s good to know that not only did he inspire other activists to pursue their goals but created a space online for people to access and use as a resource. I believe that is he was executed it would be announced in some way especially if their goal is to strike fear in others. Unfortunately no one knows the truth which makes it even more terrifying.

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  3. anthonymartinez415 says:

    When reading your response and reading the article it makes me think about specific issues with in the United States of America. Specifically, you stated, “I think that the activists online in these countries in the Middle East have admirable courage and guts to risk their lives to change the state of their societies. As for Bassell Saffadi I think that he tried to change the ideas about human rights in his country and it has cost him his life. But I find it even more extraordinary that other bloggers from other countries have continued to express their ideas and activism despite knowing the dangers of being caught.” In reference to this, if we look at our internal issues with Police brutality, we Americans become emotionally connected to these issues because we are apart of a country that is constitutional influenced and socially dominant. Additionally, with that being said, we feel obligated to stick up of for whats right and won’t let anyone get in our way. Obviously, this may be caused from having first world privileges but I do not think that activists supporting internal issue within the Middle East should not stop supporting and preaching issues regarding stoping the regime. I understand there will be death, torture, and injuries involved, but I firmly believe that if people became scared because of the disappearance of Bassell Safari, that interference, the Beirut government, would have the upper hand and would continue to display these actions upon people that rebuttal. It is now a psychological battle. Those that give into to these petty scares will become victimized and eventually end up losing if the lose faith and strength.

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  4. sgrab33 says:

    I think that it takes a grave amount of courage to speak out against ones country living in a society where there can be huge punishments and lead to death. I agree with the comment above I think it has truly become a pyshcological battle I believe that people need to realize the strength they have and keep pursiuing their freedom and dreams for a better living. We have seen how much power citizens can have once they go against the regime and I think the Middle East has done a great job and needs to continue the fight.

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