Popular Sovereignty & #YouStink

The first article called “New Paradigms of Popular Sovereignty in the Wake of the Arab Uprisings” by Paul Amar explains all the different forms of sovereignty that were happening in the Arab world. They look at a variety of paradigms which focused on authority, imperialism, history, repression, etc. One of the articles mentions the feminist organization and how they continuously fought back against the state to change moralism regardless of consequences.

The second article explains the issues that arises due many places being regulated and privatized by the mayor. One of the cities largest park was even closed due to it being believed it would cause unwanted “political violence”. While reading the article I also learned how most of the state has regulation throughout the state by “privatization” of land. There are many places that have been closed to the general public and made private for example the Corniche which is a historical urban city is now commercialized and the marina called Zaytuna Bay as well. Putting so much restrictions on land that was public at one point puts a sense of sovereignty in the State and helps keep the citizens under control.

The third reading we had to look at was on the trash issue in Lebanon.  Before looking into the #YouStink campaign I never had heard of the movement and uprising that occurred in Lebanon during August 2015. The images that were taken and shown in the article really put into perspective the crisis the country was facing and how the government controlled its people. It is awful learning how other countries allow things like this to get so out of hand. The images showed how the police was shooting water out of canons and beating people them because they were rebelling against the trash issue. They wanted it removed because it represented the government failure and was causing health illnesses. Imagine if you lived in a country that would deny you basic rights?

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Popular Sovereignty & #YouStink

You Stink

The YouStink campaign targets removing the garbage that the Lebanon government refuses to acknowledge. The movement has an active website that is published in two languages to accommodate both the locals facing the issue and those who are interested in learning more. Not only does it provide their mission and what they stand for as a group but also have direct links to social media accounts that provide even more opinions and information. What amazed me were the pictures in the article written by Taylor. It was powerful to see not only the amount of trash just there in the open, but how the protesters are dealt with. They are hosed down, beaten, shot at, and injured fighting for sanitation in their homes. You think that the government would take action to help the people. They are asking for a simple thing, which is to pick up the trash. Without following through the spread of disease as a problem arises. I put myself in their situation and it sounds horrible: the thought that trash would just pile up in the streets.

You Stink

After Tahrir

After attending the After Tahrir panel conference at 1:30 pm about the Radical Democrats and Legacies of Combat with Momen El Husseiny, Omnia Khalil, Linda Herrera, Mozn Hasan and Ranwa Yehia, I realized that in many different aspects of the Egyptians lives they are controlled directly by the government or the powerful forces.

The speech that impacted me the most was the one of the Ultras on the Egyptian football teams. I know for sure that they also exist in the Spanish football teams and people are advised not to sit next to them because they can get very furious, but nothing more than that. However with the uprising in 2011 the Ultras in Egypt were beaten, they were also prevented from wearing the group banner or t-shirts and the leader of the group would be arrested before the game to prevent any type of revolt during these events.

The Egyptian uprising ended up banning the right to protest and occupy civic space, therefore anything the Ultras did would be against the law. Even though they tried to hide the protests by building the chants by voice and performance and creating sound based songs to get back their place in the stadium and the streets, they would still have a great opposition. For example, when they said swearwords this would be seen as much worse than if any other person would say a swearword in a football match.

 “Revolutionist is and act on everyday bases. The idea of silence is a strategic movement of wait. The waiting culture.” – Momen. This comment really made me think that if the Ultras just waited and listened to what was going on maybe the campaign would have been more efficient. Many times we just start saying things without previously investigating about them and that is what takes us to commit errors. In this case I have to say that the Ultras were very brave to stand up on their beliefs no matter what was going on. The stadiums where very politicized and they just wanted a change.

After Tahrir

Gender Equality Amongst the Conservative State

I was most interested in reading these articles because they shed a lot of light on the far more underlying stories of gender inequality in Egypt leading up to and during the revolution. The relationship between what was happening on the ground and what was being portrayed in widely read Western media is an extremely important topic to take a closer look at. The article notes that news outlets were quick to vilify Arab men as dangerous, violent protestors while ignoring the true facts behind the events that were happening. For example, the article suggests that perhaps those who were involved in attacking American journalists were acting under the authority or persuasion of the conservative regime. The stories of the women protesting at this time were also completely ignored in Western media.

Reading this made me think a lot about comparing this to the articles we read last week on Khaled Said. The case for Said also suggested that there was information being led out and that the majority of people supporting the cause were ignorantly ignoring many underlying social issues. Connecting this to making the case for Egyptian women during the revolution, their entire presence was being missed, and I think that it had a lot to do with the Western media outlets completely misunderstanding the social makeup and standing of the revolution as it was happening on the ground. Being quick to pass generalized judgements leads to serious discrepancies in our understanding of events. I think that this comparison really underlines the fact that this revolution and process for social change is extremely multi-layered and does not have one answer or lens for looking at these issues.

Gender Equality Amongst the Conservative State